Glossary of Terms | CablePro™ | Computer Network Management Software

Cable  – Sheath enclosed wires wrapped/twisted into a continuous strand.

Cable Designation - Designation is used as a client layman term to identify the primary intended use of a particular cable.  The designation comes from the default file: V=Voice or Analog; S=Split cable, usually 2 Jacks; D=Data or Ethernet Jack; C=Coax; FC=Feed Cable.

Cable Drop  – The placement, stringing, pulling or running of cable from a starting point to an ending point.

Cable Drop ID – The alpha or numeric identification of a particular cable drop.

Cable ID – The alpha or numeric identification of a particular cable in a cable drop.

Cable Level – Universal Standard Rating for the frequency rage that a cable can carry for a specified distance without being amplified.  Example:  Level 3 for analog applications; Level 5 for 100 Mbps Ethernet.

Cable Project – A construction plan for the installation of cable.

Cable Tags (Labels) – Cable tags or labels are placed at the end of each cable to identify the properties of the drop.

Cable Types – Universal Standard names for cables that indicate the general description.  Example: Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP); Coaxial; Shielded Twisted Pair (STP); Fiber Optic (F).

Drop Names – Alphanumeric names used to identify where a cable drop will terminate on a jack.

Face Code – A universal code used to describe the characteristics of a faceplate covering for a cable outlet.  Example: FP11=Faceplate with a single gang outlet width a one opening for a jack; FP14=Faceplate with a single gang outlet width and four openings for a jack.

Faceplate – The covering for a cable outlet that usually is flush mounted into a wall or a termination back box is mounted to the surface of a wall or floor.  Faceplates typically have openings or insert positions for modular jacks.

Faceplate Labels – Faceplate Labels and Patch Panel Labels are affixed to faceplates and patch panels to identify the properties of the cable and jack.

Insert Positions – Openings in the cover for a cable outlet for the insertion of modular cable jacks.

Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) – A secondary or intermediate point in a cable drop/run where a cable splice may be connected to a continuing cable drop/run.

Jack Apps – A Jack App or application is a general name/description of how a jack is intended to be used.  Example: for modem; for voice; for data.

Labor Codes – Universal Standard codes for installing, running/stringing a single cable or multiple cables for a single drop.  These codes are used to specify a fixed amount of labor cost to a predefined cable drop.  Example: 1V1D means the labor to pull/run 1 voice grade cable with 1 RJ11 and 1 data grade cable with 1 RJ45 in a standard environment.

Labor Factor – A fraction of one hour represented as a percentage.  One hour contains 3,600 seconds and 1 second equals 1/3600th of an hour or 0.0003 of an hour.  60 seconds or 1 minute equals 0.0167.  6 minutes of 1/10th of an hour equals .1000, therefore 60 minutes equals 1.000 or 1 hour.

Main Distribution Frame (MDF) – A main physical location of installation cable distribution equipment such as termination blocks, cable patch panels, Ethernet devices, and other central communication equipment.

Multi-drop – The placement, stringing, pulling or running of multiple cables from a single starting point to a single ending point.

Pairs – Two wires that are wound together and share a common color code.

Patch Panel - A wiring distribution apparatus that is equipped with Universal Modular Jacks.

Pulling Labor Factor – [See Labor Factor] The amount of time, represented as a percentage of an hour, that is required to pull one or more cables just one foot.

Primary Cable - The primary cable is designated to establish the labor rate for the pulling labor.  Additional cables added or pulled with a primary cable are considered secondary cables and the pulling labor is only a percentage of the primary cable that is being pulled at the same time.

Secondary Cable - Additional cables added or pulled with a primary cable are considered secondary cables and the pulling labor is only a percentage of the primary cable that is being pulled at the same time.  For example, a primary cable may require an average of 20 seconds (includes make-ready time) to pull one foot, and to add 1 additional cable with the same number of pairs only requires 25% more time or 5 seconds to pull with the primary cable.

Shape Data Fields - Graphical charting programs like Microsoft's Visio can import data and/or labels from external sources like Excel, CablePro and Access applications.

Termination Labor Factor – [See Labor Factor] The amount of time, represented as a percentage of an hour, that is required to terminate one pair of wires at one end.

Type Of Jack – Universal/Standard Operating Codes (USOC) for modular female terminations: example; RJ11; RJ45.